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Writing Resources for Children

Writing Resources for Children Compiled by Eileen Schuh (August 2013)

Christian Mondor, Canada Council for the Arts

The Canada Council’s mandate is to foster and promote the arts in Canada through the provision of grants to professional Canadian artists and arts organizations

Grants

If you and your teachers can find a professional artist or non-profit group to pull together a project: book of short stories, for examples. Illustrations. An audio book, perhaps video.
http://canadacouncil.ca/council/grants.aspx

November is NAtional NOvel WRIting MOnth (NaNoWriMo)

There is an online community specifically for Young Writers. It includes educator resources http://nanowrimo.org/en/ywp

Giorgia Severini
Writers Guild Of Alberta

Contests/Submission (excellent info if you want to get published)
http://youngalbertawriters.com/resources/

Youth Writing Markets

The Canadian Children’s Book Centre

Meghan Howe, Library Coordinator

In addition to the following resource list they sent me, The Canadian Children’s Book Centre sponsors author tours across Canada each year to celebrate Book Week. Information on this tour and how to apply to host an author is here:http://www.bookweek.ca/application

They also run an annual Book Week Writing Contest for grades 4 -12, at the beginning of the calendar year. http://www.bookweek.ca/book-week/2013/book-week-2013-writing-contest

Kids Publishing List

The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Suite 217, 40 Orchard View Blvd.
Toronto, Ontario M4R 1B9
Tel: 416.975.0010 Fax: 416.975.8970
Email:
Website: www.bookcentre.ca

Writing by Children and Young Adults

Where to get Published!

Books and Magazines…

THE CLAREMONT REVIEW
4980 Wesley Road
Victoria, BC V8Y 1Y9
T: 250.658.5221 (weekdays, September to June)
F: 250.658.5387
E: (Linda Moran, Managing Editor)
Claremont Review

  • Publishes poetry, short stories, short plays, graphic art, photography and interviews by youth
    ages 13-19.
  • Manuscripts should be typed and cannot be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed
    envelope and sufficient Canadian postage or International Reply Coupons.
  • Please include a brief biography with your submission.
  • Submission guidelines and samples from back issues can be found at:
    www.theclaremontreview.ca/submit.htm
  • Submissions welcome from anywhere in the English speaking world.

TEEN INK
Box 30
Newton, MA 02461
E: , ,
Teen Link Submit

  • Teen Ink is a national teen magazine, book series and website dedicated to publishing a
    variety of works written by teenagers aged 13 to 19. They accept fiction and non-fiction
    stories, poems, reviews, art and photographs.
  • Work should be labeled as fiction or non-fiction, include a title, and be typed or printed in
    ink. Teen Ink recommends submitting your work online through their website.
  • Include a self-addressed, stamped envelope to be sent an acknowledgement that they received
    your work.
  • Please include your name, year of birth, home address, city, province and postal code, your
    phone number, the name of your school and your English teacher and your email address so
    they can notify you if your work has been published. If you wish to remain anonymous,
    please indicate this clearly on your piece. Teen Ink will respect your request and not display
    your name – but you still must include your name and address information with your
    submission for their records.
  • Submission guidelines can be found at www.teenink.com/submit

YOUNG VOICES ~ Library Magazine for Teens by Teens
Annual Magazine Contest
Website

  • Publishes original poems, stories, essays, articles, reviews, and artwork for cover design and
    within the book by young adult writers and artists ages 12-19, who live or go to school in
    the City of Toronto.
  • Download the submission form from Toronto Public Library’s website. Fill it out and attach
    it to your work, and drop it off at any public library branch. Written work can be submitted
    online.
  • Selected entries will be published by the Toronto Public Library.
Online Publications…

KIdsWWwrite
Visit Website

  • If you are 16 or under and like to write stories or poems, this site is for you.
  • Publishes writing by young authors and offers you a chance to share it with the world.
  • Submissions must include the child’s name, age, geographical location and email address but only the first name, age and city are published with the writing.
  • Writing should be submitted using the online form available on the website.
  • Please see www.kalwriters.com/kidswwwrite/write.html for submission details.

TEEN INK
Box 30
Newton, MA 02461
E: , ,
Teen Link Submit

  • Teen Ink is a national teen magazine, book series and website dedicated to publishing a
    variety of works written by teenagers aged 13 to 19. They accept fiction and non-fiction
    stories, poems, reviews, art and photographs.
  • Work should be labeled as fiction or non-fiction, include a title, and be typed or printed in
    ink. Teen Ink recommends submitting your work online through their website.
  • Include a self-addressed, stamped envelope to be sent an acknowledgement that they received
    your work.

YOUNG POETS
Visit Website

“Our main aim is to promote the poetry of young Canadians. Don’t be shy; send us your thoughts,
rants, musings, lyrics, voices in your head and all things poetry.”

  • Keep your submissions to 3-5 of your best poems, more if they are very short, less if they are
    very long.
  • The best way to send text is right in the body of your email.
  • Email submissions to:
  • Young Poets is striving to publish poems in all formats: audio, video, animation or anything
    else you can come up with. If you can send it via email, they’ll take it. They also publish
    Re:Verse, an ezine for young poets.
  • Please see website for submission details.

TORONTO PUBLIC LIBRARY – RAMP
Visit Website

RAMP is a place for Toronto youth to find information on jobs, books, volunteering, library
services, schools, entertainment and much more in and around Toronto. It’s also a place where teens
can contribute their ideas and art to discuss and share with other teens. Under the “Express
Yourself” section, you will see artwork and creative writing submitted by teens.

Helpful Websites

BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL ~ A GUIDE FOR YOUNG WRITERS
www.janetmcnaughton.ca/publishing.htm

  • Helpful tips on books about writing, getting published, how to submit your work, links to
    poetry website and web-zines.

PUBLISH YOUR CREATIVE WORK ~ ON-LINE THEME PAGES
www.cln.org/themes/publish.html

  • Has links to resources which will help students to publish their creative work (stories, poetry,
    art, etc) on-line.

SCHOLASTIC CANADA – For Young Writers
www.scholastic.ca/kids/authorsandillustrators/tipsforwriters/

  • Lists resources for young writers.

YOUNG ALBERTA BOOK SOCIETY
www.yabs.ab.ca/

  • Administers the Martyn Godfrey Young Writers Award for Alberta youth.

Books About Writing

Be a Writing Superstar
Written by Joel A. Sutherland
Illustrated by Patricia Storms
Toronto: Scholastic Canada, 2010
978-0-545-98000-5

Draw & Write Your Own Picture Book
Written by Emily Hearn and Mark Thurman
Markham: Pembroke Publishers Limited, 1990
0-921217-46-3

For Those About to Write: How I Learned to Love Books and Why I Had to Write Them
Written by Dave Bidini
Toronto: Tundra Books, 2007
978-0-88776-769-2

Write Now! How to turn your ideas into great stories
Written by Karleen Bradford
Richmond Hill: Scholastic Canada Limited, 1988
0-590-24931-2

Writing Maniac: How I grew up to be a writer (and you can, too!)
Written by Sheree Fitch
Markham: Pembroke Publishers Limited, 2000
1-55138-121-4

Writing Your Best Picture Book Ever
Written by Kathy Stinson
Illustrated by Alan and Lea Daniel
Markham: Pembroke Publishers Limited, 1994
1-55138-028-5

When I Grow Up, I Want to Be a Writer
Written by Cynthia MacGregor
Montreal: Lobster Press, 2001
1-894222-42-3

The Young Writer’s Companion
Written by Sarah Ellis
Toronto: Groundwood Books, 1999
0-88899-411-7

Books About Canadian Authors and Illustrators and How They Work

The Storymakers: Writing Children’s Books
Compiled by The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Markham: Pembroke Publishers Limited, 2000
1-55138-108-7

The Storymakers: Illustrating Children’s Books
Compiled by The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Markham: Pembroke Publishers Limited, 1999
1-55138-107-9

Meet Canadian Authors & Illustrators (Revised Edition)
Written by Allison Gertridge
Markham: Scholastic Canada Limited, 2002
0-439-98780-6

Local Resources

NorthWords NWT (http://northwordsnwt.ca/) is an organization of NWT writers.
Festivals, contest, mentoring, workshops. There is no age limit on attending the writers festival or entering the contests. If the students were interested in learning to write or improving their writing, and you have the funding to do so, you could also contact NorthWords through the website and find a writer who teaches writing to youth. Richard Van Camp comes to mind!

The NWT Literacy Council (http://www.nwt.literacy.ca/ ) is the main NWT literacy organization. They train, research, create materials and promote literacy, often in partnership with government and business. They have very helpful, knowledgeable staff and an excellent website with lots of resources and links. The Digital Literacy page has lots of information on how to make digital videos, podcasts, blogs, etc. which might be of particular interest to young writers. Katie Randall is the Youth Literacy Coordinator and would be a good person to talk to. In the past she has given Digital Storytelling workshops to youth in different communities. The Literacy Council phone number is 873-9262.

The NWT Public Library System has a website (http://www.nwtpls.gov.nt.ca/) with contact information for the 20 community libraries in the NWT. You can also search for an article, a book, or order a book online to be picked up at your local library.

Classroom teachers: Your best writing help comes from your classroom teachers. Take advantage of all opportunities to learn to read and write. Once you get the hang of it, literacy will become easier and easier. It won’t always be hard.